david touve

As we automate more information work, what will be left for humans to do?

Posted by in internet, science

That’s the question that directs my research.  We have made a great many of assumptions, and produced a number of theories over the years regarding the relationship between technology, work and organizations.  Most of these assumptions and theories have run into a few bumps when information technologies are concerned. So where are we headed, as our capacity to automate work increases?  Are we running out of things to do?  Or do increasingly capable, and (gasp) intelligent  technologies simply take our work and organizations in direction we never anticipated?

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What will widespread access to genetic information mean for society?

Posted by in science

As someone who has been exposed to a fair amount of research in the management realm, I am often shocked/awed/dismayed by the use of psychological testing in the hiring process. These tests play a statistical game that really should only be played by those understanding the rules. When I see these new products in the world of genetic data, like 23andME, I get a little concerned. We might as well accept at this point in time that someday, you will exchange these kind of data either before or after an…read more

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Oops, there’s another subatomic particle…

Posted by in science

So I am reading this book on artificial intelligence.  I reckon its an “old school” kind of book… Artificial Intelligence, by Philip Jackson.  Even when my head spins a bit from the mathematico-logical stuff filling the pages, I am struck by the casual and approachable style of the author.  Maybe this makes ts a coffee table book on AI, but I don’t think this is truly the case.  There is something of value in being able to communicate complex ideas in simple terms.  Or to write in a scholarly, yet…read more

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This bot has eyes, this one has none

Posted by in science

Image recognition has become a hot topic in the software world, due largely to the major success of sites like Flickr (and Yahoo! Photos), asdf, and asdf.  Slowly, software is being built resulting not only in applications that can “detect” the contents of a photos, but also bots that can “recognize” these contents by way of a comparision amongst any number of other photos.  The distinction of recognition is an important one, since at that point an application requires a sort of intelligence – the capacity to place an image…read more

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Regional genetic coding of commodities

Posted by in science

The WSJ raised some eyebrows today by highlighting some of the techniques tech companies use to maintain different regional price markets for the nearly identical products. Examples include power supplies with voltage limits (Apple and Nintendo) and inkjet cartridges that buddy up only with regionally similar printers (HP). Its only a matter of time before biotech goes the way of the tech firm, but in an even more creative manner. The genetic engineering of food stuffs is a science that breeds a whole dynamic of response from foodies the world…read more

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